Corsair Vengeance DDR3 16GB SO-DIMM Kit Notebook Memory Review [CMSX16GX3M2A1600C10]

Corsair Vengeance DDR3 16GB SO-DIMM Kit [CMSX16GX3M2A1600C10] is a high-performance notebook memory upgrade kit for up to 16 GB. Buyers, first of all, use this memory for MacBooks upgrade, because the Corsair Vengeance DDR3 16GB SO-DIMM RAM has excellent compatibility with Apple computers. Like the legendary Dominator, Vengeance DRAM for enthusiasts is designed for stable operation, factory tested and has a limited lifetime warranty from the manufacturer.

You can buy Corsair Vengeance DDR3 16GB SO-DIMM Kit RAM for the price 65,90 Don’t forget to use discount coupon on computeruniverse.netFWNNROU (How to use it?).

Specifications

  • Mfr. No .: CMSX16GX3M2A1600C10
  • 2 x DDR3 memory modules
  • Module capacity 8 GB
  • SODIMM form factor, 204-pin (for laptops)
  • 1600 MHz frequency
  • CAS Latency (CL): 10
  • Timings: 10-10-10-27
  • Power supply 1.5 V
  • Profile Performance: XMP 1.3

Review

If you’re a serious road warrior or you use your notebook for heavy-duty applications like photo and video editing, your notebook should have as much memory as possible. Adding a 4GB, 8GB or 16GB laptop memory upgrade kit will allow you to multitask between more programs at once and load and edit larger files without having to wait for data to buffer to the drive.

COMPATIBLE WITH NOTEBOOKS WITH 2ND AND 3RD GENERATION INTEL CORE PROCESSORS

1.5 Volt Vengeance SODIMM kits are designed for notebooks with a 2nd or 3rd Generation Intel® Core™ i5 or Core i7 processor. Many laptops — even those sold as performance systems — come equipped with memory that’s not capable of running at the maximum speed supported by the processor. Upgrade to a high-performance Vengeance kit, and your notebook will automatically detect the faster speed supported by the memory for instant optimized performance.

If your notebook uses a 4th Generation Intel Core processor, you should use one of our 1.35 Volt Vengeance memory kits.

A SMART PERFORMANCE UPGRADE FOR OLDER LAPTOPS, TOO

Vengeance memory is backward compatible with notebooks which use first-generation Intel Core i5 and Core i7 processors. Even if your notebook doesn’t use the latest-generation processor, you can still upgrade to 8GB using only two memory slots, and enjoy the confidence of Corsair’s renowned service and support.

SERIOUS ABOUT PC MEMORY? SO ARE WE.

Like the legendary Dominator, enthusiast-grade Vengeance DRAM is designed for stability, stringently factory-tested, and backed by our limited lifetime warranty.

MAKE YOUR SYSTEM BUILD BUDGET GO FARTHER

If you’re a gamer, a system builder, or just an all-around performance enthusiast, you should demand performance and reliability, regardless of your budget. If you need dependable, overclockable memory at an attractive price, Vengeance is a great choice.

RIGOROUS SCREENING AND EXHAUSTIVE TESTING

Speed is nothing without stability. That’s why Vengeance DDR3 memory kits, like all Corsair memory products, are carefully screened and tested to exacting standards. They’re backed up with a limited lifetime warranty that lets you buy with confidence.

Customer reviews

Buyers were satisfied with the speed characteristics of the memory and good timings (10-10-10-27). The volume of 16 gigabytes with such indicators was enough for users to work comfortably in several programs and browsers (and the browser has a lot of tabs), and work with several desktops. In resource-intensive applications, such graphic and video editing memory also performed well.

Buyers also recommend this memory for MacBook owners, since it is compatible with most Apple notebook models (however, it is better to check the information on a specific model before purchasing).

As disadvantages, users noted a rather high price and incompatibility with some of laptop models.

A possibly useful explanation for 27″ iMac buyers
January 28, 2013 [Verified Purchase]

Some buyers have expressed concern after buying this RAM and installing it in their iMacs (27″ Ivy Bridge model, late 2012).
That iMac is specced for DDR3 1600 RAM, and ships with RAM like that, but after you install this Corsair RAM your iMac will show that it is running aRAM at 1333 MHz, not 1600. So:

(a) The reason this is happening is that DRAM is (to simplify things tremendously) described by two parameters. One is bandwidth (essentially how much data it can transfer per second), the other is latency (how long does it take to set things up before that data starts being transferred).

(b) Your APPLE RAM in the iMac has a bandwidth of 1600MHz and a latency (CAS) of 11 cycles.
The Corsair RAM has a bandwidth of 1600MHz and a latency (CAS) of 10 cycles.

(c) Given that the two sets of RAM do not have identical specs, how should the memory controller configure things for optimal performance? The timings have to be identical for both sets of RAM, meaning they have to run with identical bandwidth and identical CAS.

(d) The CORRECT solution in this case would be to run both at 1600MHz and CAS of 11. However the solution chosen by the memory controller (I am guessing this is handled automatically by Ivy Bridge, not by Apple firmware, but I honestly have no idea) is to retain a CAS of 10, and drop the bandwidth to 1333, which is slow enough that the Apple RAM can run at a CAS of 10 rather than 11.
This is not a completely crazy solution. For most purposes, latency is more relevant to performance than bandwidth, so if you are faced with having to choose one over the other, you should choose to drop bandwidth while preserving latency. It’s just unfortunate than in this case the algorithm (which, remember, has to work for the possibility of people plugging in four RAM DIMMs, possibly all from different manufacturers, with different bandwidths and latencies) chooses a solution that is slightly sub-optimal compared to the best possible solution.

(e) Does it actually matter? Short answer: no. Neither Apple nor Corsair have lied to you about their RAM, and as a practical matter the difference in performance between CAS 10 and CAS 11 ram, or between running at 1600 vs 1333 is negligible (like 1%). Yes, you can undoubtedly craft some benchmark which is sensitive to the issue and which magnifies the problem, but for any real app it just doesn’t matter.
If you are so obsessive that you cannot stand this, if you buy a second batch of Corsair 16GB RAM and replace the Apple RAM, you will get back to 1600MHz, now at CAS 10 rather than CAS 11. But you honestly won’t notice any performance difference.

Bottom lines:
– The extra RAM is nice — it means paging on my iMac moves from being a rare occurrence to a non-existent occurrence, and allows that much more file system data to be stored in RAM;
– iMac will show the speed of your combined system (if you bought only two sticks, not four) as 1333 MHz, not 1600;
– There is no reason to be upset or worried about this. It does not mean anyone cheated you or that your system is running slower than it otherwise would.

Customer feedback from Amazon who said that the memory runs on MacBooks at a frequency less than the stated, and that this is normal

 

It worked fine until it didn’t
October 18, 2017 [Verified Purchase]

I purchased this as an upgrade to my wife’s macbook pro. While this doubled the memory capacity of her notebook, it only lasted about a year and a couple of months until one of the sticks failed. took me a while to isolate the problem, but i was able to confirm that both dimms (the slots they plugs into) work fine by testing them each individually with the remaining stick.

Downtime aside, the laptop now runs slower than before. The memory capacity is the same as stock, only all the RAM throughput is being forced through one dimm instead of the demand being shared across both.

When you upgrade the RAM on a laptop, you won’t notice a the difference of a millisecond or two in the latency. You will, however, notice when the RAM dies on you. So while it is fun to think you are making a performant upgrade, what really matters is dependability. I have RAM in other hardware that has lasted 8 years and counting. At this point, the product is not covered under any warranty, nor would i expect it to be. But there is an expectation that core components from a leading manufacturer should last the relatively short viable life span of the notebook, not a fraction of it.

I cannot in good faith recommend this product.

Negative review from the Amazon customer

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